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Term 3 - Thankfulness

After Christmas it is important to think about saying thank you. Of course we should be thankful for all the things we received over Christmas but we like to develop the idea more broadly to think about all the things we should be thankful for. Thankfulness has always been at the centre of the life and worship of God’s people. ‘Songs of thankfulness and praise...’ are at the heart of Christian worship. Thankfulness is directed towards God who gives and sustains life. Seeing the world as God’s creation underpins the way we approach everything in life, seeing it as a gift and not as a right. Thankfulness is important. Luke tells the story of the ten lepers who were healed and is probably challenging his readers to examine themselves when he tells of the amazement of Jesus that only one, a Samaritan, came back to thank him. (Luke 17:11-19). Jesus gave thanks to God (Matthew 11.25) and although the word ‘thankfulness’ is not common in the Gospels, recognition of his dependence on the Father infuses the whole life of Jesus. Thankfulness is a wholehearted response. It stems from a consciousness of God’s gifts and blessings. It is a joyfulness that erupts into praise. For Christians the greatest of all acts of worship is simply called ‘thanksgiving’ - eucharistia in Greek - thanksgiving for the death and resurrection of God’s Son and the way of forgiveness that is opened up.